Top 15 Waterfalls of the world

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Our Earth is so beautiful and enriched with such a spectacular resources and views that one can enjoy heaven on it. Waterfalls is one of such resources. Here is a list of top 15 waterfalls of the world, but i completely agree with the fact that this list is not transient because it’s completely subjective and lighted to each person’s experience with the falls being named.Nonetheless based on popular demand, we’ve finally come up with our own list of the favorites that we’ve personally visited.And i am sure that this list will surely change as we will further visit more waterfalls from around the world.

1. Khone Falls

The Khone Falls and Pha Pheng Falls (Lao: ຂກົກນເກະ ຜກະ ຜເກະງ) is a waterfall located in Champasak Province on the Mekong River in southern Laos, near the border with Cambodia. The Khone Falls are the largest in southeast Asia and they are the main reason that the Mekong is not fully navigable into China. The falls are characterised by thousands of islands and countless waterways, giving the area its name Si Phan Don or ‘The 4,000 islands’.
The highest falls reach to 21 metres (69 ft); the succession of rapids stretch 9.7 km (6.0 mi) of the river’s length. The average discharge of the cataract is nearly 11,000 m3/s (390,000 cu ft/s), though the highest volume on record was reached at over 49,000 m3/s (1,700,000 cu ft/s).

2. Pará Falls


The CAURA River is one of the large tributaries of the Orinoco and flows through a 5 Million ha. rainforest reserve.
The yearly precipitation range (3.300 l/) determines the heavy amount of water transported by this river.
Halfway along the river course are the PARA FALLS, the most abundant in Venezuela.
n the shape of a half moon the water thunders 60m down between green jungle islands into a gigantic throat 7 km long and afterwards forms a large sandbank (El Playon). Here is an Indian camp “El Playon” with “churuatas” (Indian dwellings) where you can overnight in hammocks and make excursions.

3. Guaíra Falls


Guaíra Falls (Spanish: Saltos del Guairá, Portuguese: Salto das Sete Quedas do Guaíra) were a series of immense waterfalls on the Paraná River along the border between Brazil and Paraguay. The falls no longer exist, inundated in 1982 by the impoundment of the Itaipu Dam reservoir. While published figures vary, ranging from 470,000 cubic feet (13,000 m3) per second to 1,750,000 cubic feet (50,000 m3) per second, Guaíra’s flow rate was among the greatest of any falls on earth.
The falls comprised 18 cataracts clustered in seven groups—hence their Portuguese name, Sete Quedas (Seven Falls)—near the Brazilian municipality of Guaíra, Paraná and Salto de Guairá, the easternmost city in Paraguay. The falls were located at a point where the Paraná River was forced through a narrow gorge. At the head of the falls, the river narrowed sharply from a width of about 1,250 feet (380 m) to 200 feet (61 m). The total height of the falls was approximately 375 feet (114 m), while the largest individual cataract was 130 feet (40 m) high. The roar of the plunging water could be heard from 20 miles (32 km) away.

4. KONGOU FALLS


Kongou Falls (also called the Koungou Falls) is a massive cataract about 2 to 3 miles wide located in Ivindo National Park in eastern Gabon. It is part of the Ivindo river and has a total height of 56 meters. It is the 928th biggest waterfall in the world.
It is reputed to be the most beautiful waterfall in Central Africa. This part of the Ivindo River is a major centre of fish biodiversity. The falls are within Ivindo National Park, created in 2002 to protect among other things this beautiful and biologically diverse stretch of river.
On 14 September 2007 President Omar Bongo Ondimba of Gabon confirmed that a dam would be built at the falls to provide electricity to a large iron mining project in Belinga further north. The iron mine is essentially for Gabon’s economic development, but the dam will inundate a large part of the National Park, and have a serious impact on local livelihoods. Old studies indicate that there are other sites on the river where a dam would be easier to build and the environmental and social impacts would be much less than at Kongou, but no Environmental impact assessment was done before the decision was made. The decision will likely put into question the President’s strategy of developing ecotourism in Gabon and may well deter investors and tourists alike.

5. Iguazu Falls


Iguazu Falls, Iguassu Falls or Iguaçu Falls (Portuguese: Cataratas do Iguaçu [kataˈɾatɐz du iɡwaˈsu]; Spanish: Cataratas del Iguazú [kataˈɾatas ðel iɣwaˈsu]; Guarani: Chororo Yguasu [ɕoɾoɾo ɨɣʷasu]) are waterfalls of the Iguazu River on the border of Brazilian State Paraná and Argentine Province Misiones. The falls divide the river into the upper and lower Iguazu. The Iguazu River originates near the city of Curitiba. It flows through Brazil for most of its course. Below its confluence with the San Antonio River, the Iguazu River forms the boundary between Brazil and Argentina.
The name “Iguazu” comes from the Guarani or Tupi words “y” , meaning “water”, and “ûasú “[waˈsu], meaning “big”. Legend has it that a god planned to marry a beautiful woman named Naipí, who fled with her mortal lover Tarobá in a canoe. In rage, the god sliced the river, creating the waterfalls and condemning the lovers to an eternal fall.The first European to find the falls was the Spanish conquistador Álvar Núñez Cabeza de Vaca in 1541.

6. Mocona, Saltos del


One of the most unique of the planet’s large-river waterfalls, Saltos de Mocona drops about 35 feet over the side of a 6000-foot long trough carved lengthwise into a basaltic formation along the Rio Uruguay. As the river bends around a sharp curve, the majority of the water flows along the top of the trough and falls over its side upon straightening. The result is a waterfall which averages almost 6700 feet in width. Visitors can stand opposite the mid-point of the falls and literally see waterfall for almost 180 degrees of view.

The falls straddle the border of Argentina and Brazil, and though the most frequented viewpoints are on the Brazilian side of the river, the majority of the waterfall appears to occur within Argentina.

7. VERMILION FALLS


The Vermillion River meanders through Scott County and Dakota County in Minnesota, emptying into the Mississippi River just south of Hastings. 13.5 miles of it are designated as a trout stream, which is unusual for being so close to a metropolitan area.
The portion of the river that supports trout is upstream, around the towns of Farmington and Empire. Near the town of Vermillion, the water becomes too warm to support trout. Downstream from the falls on the south side of Hastings, the water becomes even warmer, supporting riverine species such as northern pike and freshwater drum. The Minnesota state record black crappie of 5.0 pounds was caught in the Vermillion River in 1940. An old channel of the Vermillion River continues south from Hastings on the western edge of the Mississippi valley.
In the nineteenth and early twentieth century, the river was used for water power, supplying power to gristmills. A park surrounding the falls preserves the remains of a mill operated by Alexander Ramsey, one of the leading citizens of early Minnesota.
The Vermillion Stewards program engages people in cleanups, restoration events and educational activities and is operated by Friends of the Mississippi River.

8. CELILO FALLS


Celilo Falls (Wyam, meaning “echo of clearpores skin got worse falling water” or “sound of water upon the rocks,” in several native languages) was a tribal fishing area on the Columbia River, just east of the Cascade Mountains, on what is today the border between the U.S. states of Oregon and Washington. The name refers to a series of cascades and waterfalls on the river, as well as to the native settlements and trading villages that existed there in various configurations for 15,000 years. Celilo was the oldest continuously inhabited community on the North American continent until 1957, when the falls and nearby settlements were submerged by the construction of The Dalles Dam.

9. VICTORIA FALLS


The Victoria Falls or Mosi-oa-Tunya (Tokaleya Tonga: the Cloud that Thunders; note that the ‘i’ is silent) is a waterfall located in southern Africa on the Zambezi River between the countries of Zambia and Zimbabwe.
While it is neither the highest nor the widest waterfall in the world, it is claimed to be the largest. This claim is based on a width of 1,708 metres (5,604 ft) and height of 108 metres (354 ft), forming the largest sheet of falling water in the world. The falls’ maximum flow rate compares well with that of other major waterfalls (see table below).
For a considerable distance upstream from the falls, the Zambezi flows over a level sheet of basalt, in a shallow valley bounded by low and distant sandstone hills. The river’s course is dotted with numerous tree-covered islands, which increase in number as the river approaches the falls. There are no mountains, escarpments, or deep valleys which might be expected to create a waterfall, only flat plateau extending hundreds of kilometres in all directions.
The falls are formed as the full width of the river plummets in a single vertical drop into a transverse chasm 1708 metres (5604 ft) wide, carved by its waters along a fracture zone in the basalt plateau. The depth of the chasm, called the First Gorge, varies from 80 metres (260 ft) at its western end to 108 metres (354 ft) in the centre. The only outlet to the First Gorge is a 110 metres (360 ft) wide gap about two-thirds of the way across the width of the falls from the western end, through which the whole volume of the river pours into the Victoria Falls gorges.

10. Boyoma Falls


Boyoma Falls, formerly known as Stanley Falls, consists of seven cataracts, each no more than 15′ high, extending over more than 100 km (62 mi) along a curve of the Lualaba River between the river port towns of Ubundu and Kisangani/Boyoma in the Orientale Province of the Democratic Republic of the Congo.
At the bottom of the rapids, the Lualaba becomes the Congo River. The seven cataracts have a total drop of 61 meters (200 feet). The two major cataracts are the first below Ubundu, forming a narrow and crooked stream that is hardly accessible, and the last that can easily be seen and also be visited from Kisangani.
A 1000mm portage railway bypasses the series of rapids, connecting Kisangani and Ubundu.
Especially among French speakers the cataracts are also known as Wagenia Falls (chûtes Wagenia), referring to the local people of fishermen named Wagenia or Wagenya who have developed a special technique to fish in the river. They build systems of wooden tripods across the rapids fixed in holes carved in the rock by the water current. They serve as anchors for baskets that entrap large fish.

11. Niagara Falls


Niagara Falls (Cayuga: Gahnawehtaˀ or Tgahnawęhtaˀ) is the collective name for the Horseshoe Falls and the adjacent American Falls along with the comparatively small Bridal Veil Falls. Located on the Niagara River which drains Lake Erie into Lake Ontario, the combined falls form the highest flow rate of any waterfall in the world, with a vertical drop of more than 165 feet (50 m). Horseshoe Falls is the most powerful waterfall (vertical height along with flow rate) in North America.Niagara Falls straddles the international border between the Canadian province of Ontario and the U.S. state of New York, also forming the southern end of the Niagara Gorge. The falls are located 17 miles (27 km) north-northwest of Buffalo, New York and 75 miles (121 km) south-southeast of Toronto, between the twin cities of Niagara Falls, Ontario, and Niagara Falls, New York.

12. INGA FALLS


Inga Falls is a rapids 40 km from Matadi in the Democratic Republic of the Congo where the Congo River drops 96 m (315 ft) over the course of 15 km (9 mi).
Inga Falls form a part of a larger group of rapids – Livingstone Falls and are located closer to the lower part of these falls. Falls have formed in a sharp bend of Congo River where the width of river fluctuates from more than 4 km to mere 260 m.At medium discharge of 42,476 m³/s (1,500,000 ft³/s) it is arguably the largest waterfall in the world,although Inga Falls is not a true waterfall. Its maximum recorded volume is 70,793 m³/s (2,500,000 ft³/s).Inga falls is also the site of two large hydroelectric dams, named Inga I & II, as well as two projected dams, one of which would be the largest (by power production) in the world.

13. Livingstone Falls


Livingstone Falls consist of a series of rapids dropping 900 feet in 220 miles (270 metres in 350 km). They end in Matadi in Bas-Congo. The Congo River has the second largest flow rate in the world after the Amazon, which has no falls or rapids (except near its sources). The lowest rapids of Livingstone Falls, therefore, are the world’s largest waterfall in terms of flow rate — provided one accepts these rapids as being a waterfall. An interesting aspect of the 220-mile (350 km) long Livingstone Falls is the width of the channel. The channel is very narrow: in several stretches the channel width is less than 300 metres and for the majority of the length the channel is less than 800 metres wide. This is an extraordinarily narrow channel since the river flow rate typically exceeds 42,000 cubic metres per second (1,500,000 cu ft/s).

14. WILLAMETTE FALLS

The Willamette Falls is a natural waterfall on the Willamette River between Oregon City and West Linn, Oregon, in the United States. It is the largest waterfall in the Pacific Northwest (2nd largest in the United States behind Niagara Falls) and the eighteenth largest in the world by water volume.
Horseshoe in shape, it is 1,500 feet (460 m) wide and 40 feet (12 m) high with a flow of 30,849 cu ft/s (874 m³/s). Located 26 miles (42 km) upriver from the Willamette’s mouth, a canal and set of locks allow vessels to pass into the main Willamette Valley.

15. Jog Falls

Jog Falls, created by the Sharavathi River falling from a height of 253 m (830 ft) is the second-highest plunge falls in India (after the Nohkalikai Falls with a height of 1100 feet (335 metres) in Meghalaya) plunge waterfall in India, Located near Sagar, Karnataka Shimoga District of Karnataka state, these segmented falls are a major tourist attraction. It is also called by alternative names of Gerusoppe falls, Gersoppa Falls and Jogada Gundi.
There are many waterfalls in Asia – and also in India – which drop from a higher altitude. But, unlike most of such falls, Jog Falls is untiered, i.e., it drops directly and does not stream on to rocks. Thus, it can be described as the First-highest untiered waterfall in India. The waterfall database gives it 83 scenic points while Angel Falls is at 97.

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