10 Most Famous Streets of London

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Just as London is famed for its many landmarks and attractions, so too is it home to a number of streets whose names are known across the globe. Whether it’s because of their renowned shopping opportunities, illustrious theatres or even their use as a setting in an historic work of fiction, there are certain streets that will always attract visitors who come to London. Here is the Most Famous Streets of London.

The Mall
The Queen & other royals travels along the mall during special occasions including weddings.

Whitehall
The Cenotaph in memory of those who gave their lives in since 1918- The Foreign Office –

Free to do
London Park
Stroll through the royal parks & wonderful well kept gardens.
Feed the ducks.
Sit and have a picnic.

Downing Street
The home to the Prime Minister & when I was a child you could stand opposite number 10. Arguably one of the most recognised street names in Europe, Downing Street is home to the Prime Minister at Number 10, as well as his right hand man the Chancellor of the Exchequer at Number 11. Sadly, it is not possible to walk down the street, as it has been gated off to the public since 1989 to protect the Prime Minister from possible terrorist attacks.

Knightsbridge
Visitors from around the world flock to Knightsbridge and Brompton Road to visit the illustrious shops and department stores. This is the place to go if you’re looking for prestigious brands and up-to-the-minute trends from the world’s fashion elite. Best known for Harrods and Harvey Nichols, you’ll also find a whole host of big-name fashion designers on Sloane Street. Showing Knightsbridge caters to all tastes, there’s a big branch of Topshop opposite Harrods!

Regent Street
Harrods is by no means the only well known name in the city, with Regent Street’s celebrated Hamley’s enjoying its status as one of the world’s largest toy stores since it opened in 1981, and Piccadilly’s Fortnum and Mason another household name.

Saville Row
Known worldwide as the home of bespoke British tailoring, Savile Row is the place to come if you want a handmade suit crafted the old-fashioned way (with a price Cialis 10mg tag to match). Credited with inventing the tuxedo Henry Poole & Co – also the first Savile Row tailor – is still cutting cloth at no. 15. Other big names include Gieves & Hawkes, H. Huntsman & Sons and Ozwald Boateng. On the corner of this “golden mile” of tailoring you’ll also find the flagship Abercrombie & Fitch store.

Portobello Road
Famous worldwide thanks to the film of the same name, Notting Hill offers a vast array of small, unique shops selling unusual and vintage clothing, rare antiques, quirky gifts, books and organic food. There’s also the unmissable Portobello Road Market – a mile-long (1.6km) street with a vibrant array of different stalls set out daily. Nearby Westbourne Grove offers more high-end shopping, with stylish designer shops dotted between a mix of quirky boho boutiques, hip cafes and art galleries.

The Strand
The Strand is also home to London’s Royal Courts of Justice, as well as the Savoy Theatre, which in 1881 was the first ever public building to make use of electric light. Another theatre which owes much of its fame to a single event is Haymarket’s Her Majesty’s Theatre, which achieved a level of infamy in 1984 when much-loved British comedian Tommy Cooper quite literally died on stage after suffering a heart attack in the middle of his performance during a live television broadcast.

Abbey Road
Of course, one of the most famous albums ever recorded is named after a London street. The Beatles’ Abbey Road album takes its name from the location of the band’s recording studio in St John’s Wood, where the Liverpudlian megastars recorded all but one of their albums. The iconic album cover, featuring the band walking across a zebra crossing, was also photographed here, and the crossing has since been awarded listed status.

Fleet Street
In the world of fiction, Fleet Street, once home to the offices of many important newspapers, is also known as the home of the ‘demon barber’ Sweeney Todd, who operated his gruesome barber shop along the street. However, the most famous of London’s fictional residents is undoubtedly Sir Arthur Conan Doyle’s detective, Sherlock Holmes, who resides at number 221b Baker Street in North London.

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