Top 15 Waterfalls of the world

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Our Earth is so beautiful and enriched with such a spectacular resources and views that one can enjoy heaven on it. Waterfalls is one of such resources. Here is a list of top 15 waterfalls of the world, but i completely agree with the fact that this list is not transient because it’s completely subjective and lighted to each person’s experience with the falls being named.Nonetheless based on popular demand, we’ve finally come up with our own list of the favorites that we’ve personally visited.And i am sure that this list will surely change as we will further visit more waterfalls from around the world.

1. Khone Falls

The Khone Falls and Pha Pheng Falls (Lao: ຂກົກນເກະ ຜກະ ຜເກະງ) is a waterfall located in Champasak Province on the Mekong River in southern Laos, near the border with Cambodia. The Khone Falls are the largest in southeast Asia and they are the main reason that the Mekong is not fully navigable into China. The falls are characterised by thousands of islands and countless waterways, giving the area its name Si Phan Don or ‘The 4,000 islands’.
The highest falls reach to 21 metres (69 ft); the succession of rapids stretch 9.7 km (6.0 mi) of the river’s length. The average discharge of the cataract is nearly 11,000 m3/s (390,000 cu ft/s), though the highest volume on record was reached at over 49,000 m3/s (1,700,000 cu ft/s).

2. Pará Falls


The CAURA River is one of the large tributaries of the Orinoco and flows through a 5 Million ha. rainforest reserve.
The yearly precipitation range (3.300 l/) determines the heavy amount of water transported by this river.
Halfway along the river course are the PARA FALLS, the most abundant in Venezuela.
n the shape of a half moon the water thunders 60m down between green jungle islands into a gigantic throat 7 km long and afterwards forms a large sandbank (El Playon). Here is an Indian camp “El Playon” with “churuatas” (Indian dwellings) where you can overnight in hammocks and make excursions.

3. Guaíra Falls


Guaíra Falls (Spanish: Saltos del Guairá, Portuguese: Salto das Sete Quedas do Guaíra) were a series of immense waterfalls on the Paraná River along the border between Brazil and Paraguay. The falls no longer exist, inundated in 1982 by the impoundment of the Itaipu Dam reservoir. While published figures vary, ranging from 470,000 cubic feet (13,000 m3) per second to 1,750,000 cubic feet (50,000 m3) per second, Guaíra’s flow rate was among the greatest of any falls on earth.
The falls comprised 18 cataracts clustered in seven groups—hence their Portuguese name, Sete Quedas (Seven Falls)—near the Brazilian municipality of Guaíra, Paraná and Salto de Guairá, the easternmost city in Paraguay. The falls were located at a point where the Paraná River was forced through a narrow gorge. At the head of the falls, the river narrowed sharply from a width of about 1,250 feet (380 m) to 200 feet (61 m). The total height of the falls was approximately 375 feet (114 m), while the largest individual cataract was 130 feet (40 m) high. The roar of the plunging water could be heard from 20 miles (32 km) away.

4. KONGOU FALLS


Kongou Falls (also called the Koungou Falls) is a massive cataract about 2 to 3 miles wide located in Ivindo National Park in eastern Gabon. It is part of the Ivindo river and has a total height of 56 meters. It is the 928th biggest waterfall in the world.
It is reputed to be the most beautiful waterfall in Central Africa. This part of the Ivindo River is a major centre of fish biodiversity. The falls are within Ivindo National Park, created in 2002 to protect among other things this beautiful and biologically diverse stretch of river.
On 14 September 2007 President Omar Bongo Ondimba of Gabon confirmed that a dam would be built at the falls to provide electricity to a large iron mining project in Belinga further north. The iron mine is essentially for Gabon’s economic development, but the dam will inundate a large part of the National Park, and have a serious impact on local livelihoods. Old studies indicate that there are other sites on the river where a dam would be easier to build and the environmental and social impacts would be much less than at Kongou, but no Environmental impact assessment was done before the decision was made. The decision will likely put into question the President’s strategy of developing ecotourism in Gabon and may well deter investors and tourists alike.

5. Iguazu Falls


Iguazu Falls, Iguassu Falls or Iguaçu Falls (Portuguese: Cataratas do Iguaçu [kataˈɾatɐz du iɡwaˈsu]; Spanish: Cataratas del Iguazú [kataˈɾatas ðel iɣwaˈsu]; Guarani: Chororo Yguasu [ɕoɾoɾo ɨɣʷasu]) are waterfalls of the Iguazu River on the border of Brazilian State Paraná and Argentine Province Misiones. The falls divide the river into the upper and lower Iguazu. The Iguazu River originates near the city of Curitiba. It flows through Brazil for most of its course. Below its confluence with the San Antonio River, the Iguazu River forms the boundary between Brazil and Argentina.
The name “Iguazu” comes from the Guarani or Tupi words “y” , meaning “water”, and “ûasú “[waˈsu], meaning “big”. Legend has it that a god planned to marry a beautiful woman named Naipí, who fled with her mortal lover Tarobá in a canoe. In rage, the god sliced the river, creating the waterfalls and condemning the lovers to an eternal fall.The first European to find the falls was the Spanish conquistador Álvar Núñez Cabeza de Vaca in 1541.

6. Mocona, Saltos del


One of the most unique of the planet’s large-river waterfalls, Saltos de Mocona drops about 35 feet over the side of a 6000-foot long trough carved lengthwise into a basaltic formation along the Rio Uruguay. As the river bends around a sharp curve, the majority of the water flows along the top of the trough and falls over its side upon straightening. The result is a waterfall which averages almost 6700 feet in width. Visitors can stand opposite the mid-point of the falls and literally see waterfall for almost 180 degrees of view.

The falls straddle the border of Argentina and Brazil, and though the most frequented viewpoints are on the Brazilian side of the river, the majority of the waterfall appears to occur within Argentina.

7. VERMILION FALLS


The Vermillion River meanders through Scott County and Dakota County in Minnesota, emptying into the Mississippi River just south of Hastings. 13.5 miles of it are designated as a trout stream, which is unusual for being so close to a metropolitan area.
The portion of the river that supports trout is upstream, around the towns of Farmington and Empire. Near the town of Vermillion, the water becomes too warm to support trout. Downstream from the falls on the south side of Hastings, the water becomes even warmer, supporting riverine species such as northern pike and freshwater drum. The Minnesota state record black crappie of 5.0 pounds was caught in the Vermillion River in 1940. An old channel of the Vermillion River continues south from Hastings on the western edge of the Mississippi valley.
In the nineteenth and early twentieth century, the river was used for water power, supplying power to gristmills. A park surrounding the falls preserves the remains of a mill operated by Alexander Ramsey, one of the leading citizens of early Minnesota.
The Vermillion Stewards program engages people in cleanups, restoration events and educational activities and is operated by Friends of the Mississippi River.

8. CELILO FALLS


Celilo Falls (Wyam, meaning “echo of clearpores skin got worse falling water” or “sound of water upon the rocks,” in several native languages) was a tribal fishing area on the Columbia River, just east of the Cascade Mountains, on what is today the border between the U.S. states of Oregon and Washington. The name refers to a series of cascades and waterfalls on the river, as well as to the native settlements and trading villages that existed there in various configurations for 15,000 years. Celilo was the oldest continuously inhabited community on the North American continent until 1957, when the falls and nearby settlements were submerged by the construction of The Dalles Dam.

9. VICTORIA FALLS


The Victoria Falls or Mosi-oa-Tunya (Tokaleya Tonga: the Cloud that Thunders; note that the ‘i’ is silent) is a waterfall located in southern Africa on the Zambezi River between the countries of Zambia and Zimbabwe.
While it is neither the highest nor the widest waterfall in the world, it is claimed to be the largest. This claim is based on a width of 1,708 metres (5,604 ft) and height of 108 metres (354 ft), forming the largest sheet of falling water in the world. The falls’ maximum flow rate compares well with that of other major waterfalls (see table below).
For a considerable distance upstream from the falls, the Zambezi flows over a level sheet of basalt, in a shallow valley bounded by low and distant sandstone hills. The river’s course is dotted with numerous tree-covered islands, which increase in number as the river approaches the falls. There are no mountains, escarpments, or deep valleys which might be expected to create a waterfall, only flat plateau extending hundreds of kilometres in all directions.
The falls are formed as the full width of the river plummets in a single vertical drop into a transverse chasm 1708 metres (5604 ft) wide, carved by its waters along a fracture zone in the basalt plateau. The depth of the chasm, called the First Gorge, varies from 80 metres (260 ft) at its western end to 108 metres (354 ft) in the centre. The only outlet to the First Gorge is a 110 metres (360 ft) wide gap about two-thirds of the way across the width of the falls from the western end, through which the whole volume of the river pours into the Victoria Falls gorges.

10. Boyoma Falls


Boyoma Falls, formerly known as Stanley Falls, consists of seven cataracts, each no more than 15′ high, extending over more than 100 km (62 mi) along a curve of the Lualaba River between the river port towns of Ubundu and Kisangani/Boyoma in the Orientale Province of the Democratic Republic of the Congo.
At the bottom of the rapids, the Lualaba becomes the Congo River. The seven cataracts have a total drop of 61 meters (200 feet). The two major cataracts are the first below Ubundu, forming a narrow and crooked stream that is hardly accessible, and the last that can easily be seen and also be visited from Kisangani.
A 1000mm portage railway bypasses the series of rapids, connecting Kisangani and Ubundu.
Especially among French speakers the cataracts are also known as Wagenia Falls (chûtes Wagenia), referring to the local people of fishermen named Wagenia or Wagenya who have developed a special technique to fish in the river. They build systems of wooden tripods across the rapids fixed in holes carved in the rock by the water current. They serve as anchors for baskets that entrap large fish.

11. Niagara Falls


Niagara Falls (Cayuga: Gahnawehtaˀ or Tgahnawęhtaˀ) is the collective name for the Horseshoe Falls and the adjacent American Falls along with the comparatively small Bridal Veil Falls. Located on the Niagara River which drains Lake Erie into Lake Ontario, the combined falls form the highest flow rate of any waterfall in the world, with a vertical drop of more than 165 feet (50 m). Horseshoe Falls is the most powerful waterfall (vertical height along with flow rate) in North America.Niagara Falls straddles the international border between the Canadian province of Ontario and the U.S. state of New York, also forming the southern end of the Niagara Gorge. The falls are located 17 miles (27 km) north-northwest of Buffalo, New York and 75 miles (121 km) south-southeast of Toronto, between the twin cities of Niagara Falls, Ontario, and Niagara Falls, New York.

12. INGA FALLS


Inga Falls is a rapids 40 km from Matadi in the Democratic Republic of the Congo where the Congo River drops 96 m (315 ft) over the course of 15 km (9 mi).
Inga Falls form a part of a larger group of rapids – Livingstone Falls and are located closer to the lower part of these falls. Falls have formed in a sharp bend of Congo River where the width of river fluctuates from more than 4 km to mere 260 m.At medium discharge of 42,476 m³/s (1,500,000 ft³/s) it is arguably the largest waterfall in the world,although Inga Falls is not a true waterfall. Its maximum recorded volume is 70,793 m³/s (2,500,000 ft³/s).Inga falls is also the site of two large hydroelectric dams, named Inga I & II, as well as two projected dams, one of which would be the largest (by power production) in the world.

13. Livingstone Falls


Livingstone Falls consist of a series of rapids dropping 900 feet in 220 miles (270 metres in 350 km). They end in Matadi in Bas-Congo. The Congo River has the second largest flow rate in the world after the Amazon, which has no falls or rapids (except near its sources). The lowest rapids of Livingstone Falls, therefore, are the world’s largest waterfall in terms of flow rate — provided one accepts these rapids as being a waterfall. An interesting aspect of the 220-mile (350 km) long Livingstone Falls is the width of the channel. The channel is very narrow: in several stretches the channel width is less than 300 metres and for the majority of the length the channel is less than 800 metres wide. This is an extraordinarily narrow channel since the river flow rate typically exceeds 42,000 cubic metres per second (1,500,000 cu ft/s).

14. WILLAMETTE FALLS

The Willamette Falls is a natural waterfall on the Willamette River between Oregon City and West Linn, Oregon, in the United States. It is the largest waterfall in the Pacific Northwest (2nd largest in the United States behind Niagara Falls) and the eighteenth largest in the world by water volume.
Horseshoe in shape, it is 1,500 feet (460 m) wide and 40 feet (12 m) high with a flow of 30,849 cu ft/s (874 m³/s). Located 26 miles (42 km) upriver from the Willamette’s mouth, a canal and set of locks allow vessels to pass into the main Willamette Valley.

15. Jog Falls

Jog Falls, created by the Sharavathi River falling from a height of 253 m (830 ft) is the second-highest plunge falls in India (after the Nohkalikai Falls with a height of 1100 feet (335 metres) in Meghalaya) plunge waterfall in India, Located near Sagar, Karnataka Shimoga District of Karnataka state, these segmented falls are a major tourist attraction. It is also called by alternative names of Gerusoppe falls, Gersoppa Falls and Jogada Gundi.
There are many waterfalls in Asia – and also in India – which drop from a higher altitude. But, unlike most of such falls, Jog Falls is untiered, i.e., it drops directly and does not stream on to rocks. Thus, it can be described as the First-highest untiered waterfall in India. The waterfall database gives it 83 scenic points while Angel Falls is at 97.

10 Interesting Facts about Dreams

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Dreaming is one of the most mysterious and interesting experiences in our lives.
During the Roman Era some dreams were even submitted to the Roman Senate for analysis and dream interpretation. They were thought to be messages from the gods. Dream interpreters even accompanied military leaders into battles and campaigns!

In addition to this, it is also known that many artists have received their creative ideas from their dreams.

But what do we actually know about dreams?
Here are 10 interesting facts about dreams – enjoy and what’s most important, don’t forget to share your dream stories in the comment section!

1. You Forget 90% of Your Dreams

Within 5 minutes of waking half of your dream is forgotten. Within 10, 90% is gone.

2. Blind People also Dream

People who became blind after birth can see images in their dreams. People who are born blind do not see any images, but have dreams equally vivid involving their other senses of sound, smell, touch and emotion.

3. Everybody Dreams

Every human being dreams (except in cases of extreme psychological disorder). If you think you are not dreaming – you just forget your dreams.

4. In Our Dreams We Only See Faces That We already Know

Our mind is not inventing faces – in our dreams we see real faces of real people that we have seen during our life but may not know or remember. We have all seen hundreds of thousands of faces throughout our lives, so we have an endless supply of characters for our brain to utilize during our dreams.

5. Not Everybody Dreams in Color

A full 12% of sighted people dream exclusively in black and white. The remaining number dream in full color. Studies from 1915 Meratol through to the 1950s maintained that the majority of dreams were in black and white, but these results began to change in the 1960s. Today only 4.4% of the dreams of under-25 year-olds are in black and white. Recent research has suggested that those changing results may be linked to the switch from black-and-white film and TV to color media.

6. Dreams are Symbolic

If you dream about some particular subject it is not often that the dream is about that. Dreams speak in a deeply symbolic language. Whatever symbol your dream picks on it is most unlikely to be a symbol for itself.

7. Emotions

The most common emotion experienced in dreams is anxiety. Negative emotions are more common than positive ones.

8. You can have four to seven dreams in one night.

On average you can dream anywhere from one or two hours every night.

9. Animals Dream Too

Studies have been done on many different animals, and they all show the same brain waves during dreaming sleep as humans. Watch a dog sleeping sometime. The paws move like they are running and they make yipping sounds as if they are chasing something in a dream.

10. Body Paralysis

Rapid eye movement (REM) sleep is a normal stage of sleep characterized by rapid movements of the eyes. REM sleep in adult humans typically occupies 20-25% of total sleep, about 90-120 minutes of a night’s sleep.

During REM sleep the body is paralyzed by a mechanism in the brain in order to prevent the movements which occur in the dream from causing the physical body to move. However, it is possible for this mechanism to be triggered before, during, or after normal sleep while the brain awakens.

Human Hair Necklaces by Kerry Howley

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“Attraction/Aversion” is Kerry Howley’s award winning graduate collection, winning the Museum of Domestic Architecture’s Arthur Silver Award for graduate innovation and excellence. It is a material exploration of how people can feel seemingly opposing emotional responses simultaneously.

The necklaces are made payday loans teletrack of human hair, a familiar material that we take pride in. However once off of the body hair becomes an innate source of aversion. Kerry wanted to see if she could make discarded hair attractive again.
Read More About Her

Top 15 World’s Largest Ships

The world’s longest ships are listed according to their overall length (LOA), which is the maximum length of the vessel measured between the extreme points in fore and aft. In addition the ships’ deadweight tonnage (DWT) and gross tonnage (GT) are presented as they are often used to describe the size of a vessel.
Here is the gallery of Top 15 World’s Largest Ships

1.Seawise Giant

The largest moving man-made object ever built.  The longest ship ever built.  The ship with the greatest deadweight tonnage ever recorded, at 646,642 tons.  This is the ULCC.  She was originally built as the SEAWISE GIANT, and later possessed the names HAPPY GIANT, and JAHRE VIKING.  Her final name was MONT, the name given to her for her final voyage from the Middle East toTop 15 World’s Largest Ships India.  She now lies beached in the graveyard of ships in Alang, India where she is slowly being ripped to pieces.

Specifications:

Tonnage: 260,941 GT
214,793 NT
Displacement: 81,879 long tons light ship
646,642 long tons full load
Length: 458.45 m (1,504.10 ft)
Beam: 68.8 m (225.72 ft)
Draught: 24.611 metres (80.74 ft)
Depth: 29.8 m (97.77 ft)
Propulsion: Steam Turbine
Speed: 16 knots
Capacity: 564,763 DWT

2.Pierre Guillaumat (supertanker)

It was the 2nd biggest ship ever built in the history of mankind but it didn’t last quite long enough as was expected. Pierre Guillaumat was a supertanker, built in 1977 by Chantiers de l’Atlantique at Saint-Nazaire for Compagnie Nationale de Navigation. Pierre Guillaumat, which was the third vessel of Batillus class supertankers Top 15 World’s Largest Ships(the other three, slightly smaller, were Batillus, Bellamya and Prairial), is distinguished as the biggest ship ever constructed, surpassed in size only by Seawise Giantbuilt in 1976, and only subsequently lengthened, although the four ships of the Batillus class had a larger gross tonnage.

Tonnage: 555,051 DWT
274,838 GT ITC
224,831 NET
Length: 414.23 m (1,359 ft 0 in)
Beam: 63.05 m (206 ft 10 in)
Depth: 28.603 m (93 ft 10.1 in)
Propulsion: 4 × Stal-Laval single, reduced steam turbine engines
Speed: 16 knots

3.Batillus

Batillus was a supertanker, built in 1976 by Chantiers de l’Atlantique at Saint-Nazaire for the French branch of Shell Oil. The first vessel of homonymous Batillus class supertankers. Batillus, together with her sister ships Bellamya, Pierre Guillaumat and Prairial, was one of the biggest ships in the world, surpassed in size only by Seawise Giant (later Jahre Viking, Happy Giant and Knock Nevis) built in 1976, and extended in 1981, although the four ships of the Batillus class had a larger gross tonnage.

Her last voyage was from Vestnes to Kaoshiung (Taiwan) where she arrived on December 28, 1985. to be scrapped. One of the main reasons of scrapping the Batillus was purely financial keeping in view its very less usage and demand. When Top 15 World’s Largest Shipsit comes to weight capacity, the deadweight capacity of Batillus was almost 554,000 and the speed of this big ship was 16 to 17 knots. The length of Batilluswas almost 1,359 feet.
1976, and only subsequently lengthened, although the four ships of the Batillus class had a larger gross tonnage.

Tonnage: 553.662 DWT
274.268 GT ITC
225.473 NET
Length: 414.22 m (1,359 ft 0 in)
Beam: 63.01 m (206 ft 9 in)
Depth: 28.50 m (93 ft 6 in)
Propulsion: 4 × Stal-Laval single, reduced steam turbine engines
Speed: 16 knots

4.Bellamya

The ship was completed and put in service in 1976, months after the completion of her sister ship Batillus, and that of the new, purposely built, oil terminal Antifer, near Le Havre, one of very few ports in the world capable of accommodating Batillus class tankers. Top 15 World’s Largest Ships
The international oil market however, did not improve; her size also placed restrictions on where she could be employed, and this must have led to vigrx plus paypal her early demise. Active service ended when Bellamya was laid up at Vestnes, Norway, on January 26, 1984, and she arrived at Ulsan, South Korea on January 6, 1986 to be scrapped.

Tonnage: 553,662 DWT
273,550 GT ITC
225,473 NET
Length: 414.22 m (1,359 ft 0 in)[
Beam: 63.01 m (206 ft 9 in)
Depth: 28.50 m (93 ft 6 in)
Propulsion: 4 × Stal-Laval single, reduced steam turbine engines
Speed: 16 knots

5.Prairial (supertanker)

It was the only ship of that class to have a career longer than ten years, sailing until 2003, although under different names: Sea Brilliance (1985), Hellas Fos (1986) and Sea Giant (1997). She is also distinguished as the third biggest ship ever constructed, surpassed in size only by Seawise Giant built-in 1976 and subsequently lengthened, and her sister ship Pierre Guillaumat. Top 15 World’s Largest Ships

Prairial was an Oil Tanker which has served the world for almost 34 years by transporting crude oil and goods from one corner of the world to the other. Prairial is the only big ship which, despite undergoing many name changes with the passage of time, is still mostly known by its first name.

Tonnage: 555,046 DWT
274,826
Length: 414.22 m (1,359 ft 0 in)
Beam: 63.05 m (206 ft 10 in)
Depth: 28.60 m (93 ft 10 in)
Propulsion: 4 × Stal-Laval single, reduced steam turbine engines
Speed: 16 knots

6. Esso Atlantic

Esso Atlantic is one of the most popular historic names in the big ships category. This huge ship used to be the best in its time and has served the world with its consistent services level of straight 35 years. Basically it was an OilTop 15 World’s Largest Ships tanker with the deadweight tonnage capacity of almost 516,000 tones. The length of this huge ship was 1,334 feet and the speed capacity was up to 16 knots. Esso Atlanticwas disposed off as scrap on 2002 in Pakistan.

Tonnage: 516,000 tones
Length: 1,334 ft
Depth: 28.60 m (93 ft 10 in)
Propulsion: 4 × Stal-Laval single, reduced steam turbine engines
Speed: 16 knots

7.Emma Mærsk

In the list of top 10 biggest ships of the world, Emma Maerskis currently the biggest ship which is still in service. Along with this title,Emma Mærsk is the first container ship in the E-class of eight owned by the A. P. Moller-Maersk Group. When she was launched in 2006, Emma Mærsk was the largest container ship ever built.Top 15 World’s Largest Ships

As of 2010, she and her seven sister ships are the longest container ships constructed and the longest ships currently in use, after the largest ship ever built, Seawise Giant, was permanently moored in 2004 and scrapped in 2010.Officially, Emma Mærsk is able to carry around 11,000 twenty-foot equivalent units (TEU) or 14,770 TEU depending on definition. In May 2010, the class set a record of 15,011 TEU in Tanger-Med, Tangiers on sister Ebba Mærsk. Emma Maerskis one of the most finely made biggest ships present today.

Tonnage: 159,000 tones
Length: 1,305 feet.
Depth: 28.60 m (93 ft 10 in)
Propulsion: 4 × Stal-Laval single, reduced steam turbine engines
Speed: 26 knots

8.Estelle Mærsk

Estelle Mærsk is a container ship owned and run by the Mærsk Line. She was, as of 2009 the largest ever built by terms of gross tonnage. Estelle Mærsk has a capacity of 11,000 twenty-foot equivalent units (TEU),Top 15 World’s Largest Ships including around 1,000 40 feet (12 m) reefer containers, though a maximum capacity of 13,500 TEU is claimed. She is identical to the seven other ships in the Maersk PS-Class, the first built of which was Emma Maersk.

Tonnage: 151,687 GT
Length: 1,302.5 ft (397.0 m)
Beam: 183.7 ft (56.0 m)
Depth: 98.4 ft (30.0 m)
Propulsion: 4 × Stal-Laval single, reduced steam turbine engines
Speed: 10 knots

Northern Lights (30 Pictures)

Seeing the northern lights, or the aurora borealis, as they are also known, is a jaw-dropping and mystical moment.

The lights are at their most frequent in late autumn and winter/early spring. Between the autumn equinox and spring equinox (21 September – 21 March), it is dark between 6 pm and 1 am, and you have maximum chances of spotting the lights. However, the weather is also of importance, and September, October and November tend to be wet and snowless in the north.

The northern lights belt hits Northern Norway in the Lofoten Islands, and follows the coast all the way up to The northern lights belt hits Northern Norway in the Lofoten Islands, and follows the coast all the way up to the North Cape. This means that no other penis enlargement pill forum place on earth offers better chances of spotting the lights, and one location in this area might be as good as another.. This means that no other place on earth offers better chances of spotting the lights, and one location in this area might be as good as another.

Aurora is an unpredictable lady, and you never know when she will decide to turn up. This diva keeps you waiting, so whenever you go hunting for the northern lights above the Arctic Circle, make sure you set aside the whole evening. Northern lights worshippers do everything from cross-country skiing to building snowmen in order to keep warm and entertained while outside.

However, organised tours are a good alternative.

Here is the gallery of 30 pictures of  Northern Lights .

Northern Lights

50 Coolest 3D Tattoo Designs

Finding pictures of tattoos is the main way that helps to determine which type of tattoo is right for you. Seeing many pictures can help to create the inspiration that is required for a custom tattoo design Viagra 100mg. After a great response on our previous entries : Music tattoos for girls, Greek Tattoo Designs and Tattoos for girls. We have decided to come up with a list on 3D Tattoo designs.

15 Largest BattleShips

Here We Presents Dangerous and Largest Battleships Around The World.A battleship is a large armored warship with a main battery consisting of heavy caliber guns. Battleships are larger, with better arms and armor, than cruisers and destroyers. As the largest armed ships in a fleet, battleships were used to attain command of the sea and represented the apex of a nation’s naval power from about 1875 up until World War II. With the rise of air power, guided missiles, and guided bombs, large guns were no longer deemed necessary to establish naval superiority and as a result battleships faded from use.

1.Le Napoléon (1850), the first steam battleship
Largest BattleShips
The Napoléon was a 90-gun ship of the line of the French Navy, and the very first purpose-built steam battleship in the world.She is also considered the first true steam battleship, and the first screw battleship ever.Launched in 1850, she was the lead ship of a class of 9 battleships, all considered as very successful and built over a period of 10 years. This class of ship was designed by the famous naval designer Dupuy de Lôme.Read More

2.The French La Gloire (1859), the first ocean–going ironclad warship
Largest BattleShips
The French Navy’s La Gloire (“Glory”) was the first ocean-going ironclad battleship in history.
She was developed following the Crimean War, in response to new developments in naval gun technology, especially the Paixhans guns and rifled guns, which used explosive shells with increased destructive power against wooden ships, and followed the development of the ironclad floating batteries built by the British and French for the bombardment of Russian forts during the Crimean War. She was designed by the French naval architect Dupuy de Lôme, and was launched at the arsenal of Mourillon, Toulon, on 24 November 1859. Two sister-ships were built.Read More

3. HMS Warrior (1860), the Royal Navy’s first ocean–going iron hulled warship.
Largest BattleShips
HMS Warrior was the first armour-plated, iron-hulled warship, built for the Royal Navy in response to the first ironclad warship, the French Gloire, launched a year earlier.
When completed in October 1861, Warrior was the largest, fastest, most heavily armed and most heavily armoured warship the world had seen. She was almost twice the size of Gloire and thoroughly outclassed the French ship in speed, armour, and gunnery.
Warrior did not introduce any radical new technology, but for the first time combined steam engines, rifled breech-loading guns, iron construction, iron armour, and the propeller in one ship, and all built to an unprecedented scale.Read More

4.The French Redoutable (1876), the first battleship to use steel as the main building materialLargest BattleShips
Redoutable (1876) was a central battery and barbette ship of the French Navy. She was the first warship in the world to use steel as the principal building material.[13]
Compared to iron, steel allowed for greater structural strength for a lower weight. France was the first country to manufacture steel in large quantities, using the Siemens process. At that time, steel plates still had some defects, and the outer bottom plating of the ship was made of wrought iron.
All-steel warships were later built by the Royal Navy, with the dispatch vessels Iris and Mercury, laid down in 1875-1876.Read More

5. Pre-Dreadnought battleship USS Texas, built in 1892, was the first battleship of the U.S. Navy. Photochrom print c. 1898.Largest BattleShips
USS Texas was a second-class pre-dreadnought battleship built by the United States in the early 1890s, the first American battleship commissioned[1] and the first ship named in honor of the state of Texas to be built by the United States.[a] Built in reaction to the acquisition of modern armored warships by several South American countries, Texas was meant to incorporate the latest developments in naval tactics and design. This includes the mounting of her main armament en echelon to allow maximum end–on fire and a heavily–armored redoubt amidships to ensure defensive strength. However, due to the state of U.S. industry at the time, Texas’s building time was lengthy and by the time she was commissioned, she was already out–of–date. Nevertheless, she and her near–sister USS Maine were considered advancements in American naval design.Read More

6.Diagram of HMS Agamemnon (1908), a typical late pre-dreadnought battleshipLargest BattleShips
HMS Agamemnon was one of two Lord Nelson-class pre-dreadnought battleships launched in 1906 and completed in 1908. She was the Royal Navy’s second-to-last pre-dreadnought battleship to be built, followed by her sister ship, Lord Nelson. She was assigned to the Channel Fleet when World War I began in 1914. The ship was transferred to the Mediterranean Sea with Lord Nelson in early 1915 to participate in the Dardanelles Campaign. She made a number of bombardments against Turkish fortifications and in support of British troops. Agamemnon remained in the Mediterranean after the conclusion of that campaign to prevent the German battlecruiser SMS Goeben and light cruiser Breslau from breaking out into the Mediterranean. Agamemnon shot down the German Zeppelin LZ85 during a bombing mission over Salonica in 1916. On 30 October 1918 the Ottoman Empire signed the Armistice of Mudros on board the ship while she was anchored at Lemnos in the northern Aegean Sea. She was converted to a radio-controlled target ship following her return to the United Kingdom in March 1919 and began service in 1921. Agamemnon was replaced by Centurion at the end of 1926 and sold for scrap in January 1927, the last pre-dreadnought in service with the Royal Navy.Read More

7.Japanese battleship Satsuma
Largest BattleShips
Satsuma (薩摩 (戦艦)?, Satsuma (senkan) was a semi-dreadnought type battleship of the Imperial Japanese Navy, designed and built in Japan by the Yokosuka Naval Arsenal. The name Satsuma comes from Satsuma Province, now a part of Kagoshima prefecture. Some naval historians regard the battleship Aki as her sister ship, although Aki differed considerably with her turbine-powered engine and sleek silhouette.Read More

8.High Seas Fleet
Largest BattleShips
The High Seas Fleet (Hochseeflotte) was the battle fleet of the German Imperial Navy and saw action during World War I. The formation was created in February 1907, when the Home Fleet (Heimatflotte) was renamed as the High Seas Fleet. Admiral Alfred von Tirpitz was the architect of the fleet; he envisioned a force powerful enough to challenge the Royal Navy’s predominance. Kaiser Wilhelm II, the emperor of Germany, championed the fleet as the instrument by which he would seize overseas possessions and make Germany a global power. By concentrating a powerful battle fleet in the North Sea while the Royal Navy was required to disperse its forces around the British Empire, Tirpitz believed Germany could achieve a balance of force that could seriously damage British naval hegemony. This was the heart of Tirpitz’s “Risk Theory,” which held that Britain would not challenge Germany if the latter’s fleet posed such a significant Ativan Dosage threat to its own.Read More

9.SMS Szent István
Largest BattleShips
SMS Szent István was a Tegetthoff-class dreadnought of the Austro-Hungarian Navy, the only one built in the Hungarian part of Austria-Hungary. The Ganz & Company’s Danubius Yard in Hungarian-owned Fiume (Rijeka) was awarded the contract to build the battleship in return for the Hungarian government agreeing to the 1910 and 1911 naval budgets. She was named after Hungary’s first Christian king, Saint Stephen (Hungarian: Szent István). She, and her classmates, were regarded as very compact and powerful ships and were the first dreadnoughts in service with triple main-gun turretsRead More

10.SMS Ostfriesland
Largest BattleShips
SMS Ostfriesland (“His Majesty’s Ship East Frisia”)[Note 1] was the second vessel of the Helgoland class of battleships of the German Imperial Navy. Named for the region of East Frisia, Ostfriesland’s keel was laid in October 1908 at the Kaiserliche Werft dockyard in Wilhelmshaven. She was launched on 30 September 1909 and was commissioned into the fleet on 1 August 1911. The ship was equipped with twelve 30.5-centimeter (12.0 in) guns in six twin turrets, and had a top speed of 21.2 knots (39.3 km/h; 24.4 mph). Ostfriesland was assigned to the I Battle Squadron of the High Seas Fleet for the majority of her career, including World War I.
Along with her three sister ships, Helgoland, Thüringen, and Oldenburg, Ostfriesland participated in all of the major fleet operations of World War I in the North Sea against the British Grand Fleet. This included the Battle of Jutland on 31 May – 1 June 1916, the largest naval battle of the war. The ship also saw action in the Baltic Sea against the Russian Navy. She was present during the unsuccessful first incursion into the Gulf of Riga in August 1915.Read More

11.USS Colorado (BB-45)
Largest BattleShips
USS Colorado (BB-45), the third ship of the United States Navy named in honor of the 38th state, was the lead ship of her class of battleships. Her keel was laid down on 29 May 1919 by the New York Shipbuilding Corporation of Camden, New Jersey. She was launched on 22 March 1921 sponsored by Mrs. Max Melville, Denverite, daughter of United States Senator from Colorado Samuel D. Nicholson; and commissioned on 30 August 1923, Captain R. R. Belknap in command.Read More

12.USS Texas (BB-35)
Largest BattleShips
USS Texas (BB-35), the second ship of the United States Navy named in honor of the U.S. state of Texas, is a New York-class battleship. The ship was launched on 18 May 1912 and commissioned on 12 March 1914.
Soon after her commissioning, Texas saw action in Mexican waters following the “Tampico Incident” and made numerous sorties into the North Sea during World War I. When the United States formally entered World War II in 1941, Texas took on the role of escorting war convoys across the Atlantic, and she later shelled Axis-held beaches for the North African campaign and the Normandy Landings before being transferred to the Pacific Theater late in 1944 to provide naval gunfire support during the Battles of Iwo Jima and Okinawa.Read more

13.USS Missouri (BB-63)
Largest BattleShips
USS Missouri (BB-63) (“Mighty Mo” or “Big Mo”) is a United States Navy Iowa-class battleship, and was the third ship of the U.S. Navy to be named in honour of the US state of Missouri. Missouri was the last battleship built by the United States, and was the site of the surrender of the Empire of Japan which ended World War II.
Missouri was ordered in 1940 and commissioned in June 1944. In the Pacific Theater of World War II she fought in the battles of Iwo Jima and Okinawa and shelled the Japanese home islands, and she fought in the Korean War from 1950 to 1953. She was decommissioned in 1955 into the United States Navy reserve fleets (the “Mothball Fleet”), but reactivated and modernized in 1984 as part of the 600-ship Navy plan, and provided fire support during Operation Desert Storm in January/February 1991.Read More

14.The firepower of a battleship demonstrated by USS Iowa
Largest BattleShips
USS Iowa (BB-61) was the lead ship of her class of battleship and the fourth in the United States Navy to be named in honor of the 29th state. Owing to the cancellation of the Montana-class battleships, Iowa is the last lead ship of any class of United States battleships, and was the only ship of her class to have served in the Atlantic Ocean during World War II.
During World War II, she carried President Franklin D. Roosevelt across the Atlantic to Casablanca en route to a crucial 1943 meeting in Tehran with British Prime Minister Winston Churchill and Soviet leader Josef Stalin. She has a bathtub — an amenity installed for Roosevelt, along with an elevator to shuttle him between decks.[1] When transferred to the Pacific Fleet in 1944, Iowa shelled beachheads at Kwajalein and Eniwetok in advance of Allied amphibious landings and screened aircraft carriers operating in the Marshall Islands. She also served as the Third Fleet flagship, flying Adm. William F. Halsey’s flag at the Japanese surrender in Tokyo Bay. During the Korean War, Iowa was involved in raids on the North Korean coast, after which she was decommissioned into the United States Navy reserve fleets, better known as the “mothball fleet.” She was reactivated in 1984 as part of the 600-ship Navy plan, and operated in both the Atlantic and Pacific Fleets to counter the recently expanded Soviet Navy. In April 1989, an explosion of undetermined origin wrecked her #2 gun turret, killing 47 sailors.Read More

15.Japanese battleship Yamato
Largest BattleShips
Yamato (大和?), named after the ancient Japanese Yamato Province, was the lead ship of the Yamato class of battleships that served with the Imperial Japanese Navy during World War II. She and her sister ship, Musashi, were the heaviest and most powerfully armed battleships ever constructed, displacing 72,800 tonnes at full load and armed with nine 46 cm (18.1 inch) main guns. Neither ship survived the war.
Laid down in 1937 and formally commissioned a week after the Pearl Harbor attack in late 1941, Yamato was designed to counter the numerically superior battleship fleet of the United States, Japan’s main rival in the Pacific. Throughout 1942 she served as the flagship of the Japanese Combined Fleet, and in June 1942 Admiral Isoroku Yamamoto directed the fleet from her bridge during the disastrous Battle of Midway. Musashi took over as the Combined Fleet flagship in early 1943, and Yamato spent the rest of the year, and much of 1944, moving between the major Japanese naval bases of Truk and Kure in response to American threats. Although she was present at the Battle of the Philippine Sea in June 1944, Yamato played no part in the battle. Read More

60 World Records for kids to Break

I have recently red about World strongest kid. A Romanian boy, Giuliano Stroe, who by the age of five was already recorded by the Guinness World Book, twice, as the strongest kid in the world. He does a lot of stunts, like hand walking, air push-ups, lifting weights and has an impressive body.

Readers appreciated two of my previous findings on world records.

1. Sex World Records
2. Easy World Records to Break

That Romanian Boy Inspired me to find more such extra ordinary kids and their attempts. These World Records for Kids are easy to break. Just need Practice and strong will.

1. Longest line of coins:

Current Holder paycheck advances payday loans cashadvance cashadv: THINK Together

FONTANA, CA, USA — Close to 2,000 students and 200 chaperones worked nearly six and a half hours to lay down a 65 mile chain of pennies on the racetrack at Auto Club Speedway in Fontana, CA, setting a new World Record for the longest line of coins.

2. Wearing most underpants

Current Holder: Jack Singer

WARWICK, NY, USA — Jack Singer, 10, a fourth-grade student at Sanfordville Elementary School, spent his birthday stepping into more than 200 pairs of undies – setting the new world record for the wearing the most pairs of underpants at the same time.

Find the Complete List on Official site of Guinness World Records.